Charles Moran

Feb 22, 2018 by

Charles Moran ( ) replaced the original Doc Savage editor, John Nanovic, and altered the direction of Doc Savage Magazine. Moran downplayed the fantastic adventures, gadgets, and larger-than-life villains in favor of a style best described as Doc Savage, Private Investigator. Moran’s time as editor was a mere six months, but the magazine continued down the PI road.

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William J. de Grouchy

Feb 22, 2018 by

William J. de Grouchy

In December 1943*, Street & Smith editor and promotions manager William John de Grouchy (1889- Nov. 29, 1954) was named the Editor for Doc Savage magazine. However, Will Murray has written that Babette Rosmond actually did the work though she assigned the Doc Savage novels to her unnamed assistant.

de Grouchy had previously edited the Shadow magazine and ran a company, Penn Art, that eventually supplied the art for the comic and other publications.

* – Marilyn Cannaday states January 1944 in Bigger Than Life: The Creator of Doc Savage

Obituary – December 1954:



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Hiram Richardson

Feb 20, 2018 by

Hiram Richardson illustrated the cover of the Bantam release Doc Savage Omnibus 6. Richardson began his cover illustration career in 1976 and, like James Bama, branched into fine art. More example of his work can be found on his studio site.

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Emery Clarke

Feb 20, 2018 by

Emery Clarke

John Emery Clarke (1911-1990) painted a number of Doc Savage covers for Street and Smith.

“The friendship between Clarke and Gladney is poignantly recorded on the December 1938 cover of Doc Savage, which features a self-portrait of Emery Clark (top left with gray hair and glasses) beside a portrait of Graves Gladney (in center with fedora and cigarette).” — Pulp Artists

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Walter Timmins

Feb 19, 2018 by

Walter Timmins

Walter Timmins painted the “United We Stand” cover for the July 1942 Street and Smith line of magazines. It was the art for the Doc Savage title, The Man Who Fell Up. For more information see Timmins’s entry at the Field Guide of Wild American Pulp Arts.

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