Brigadier General Theodore Marley “Ham” Brooks was an accomplished attorney. Like Monk, Ham was present in the majority of novels. “Ham was designated on formal occasions. Slender, waspy, quick-moving, Ham looked what he was – a quick thinker and possibly the most astute lawyer Harvard ever turned out. He carried a plain black cane – […]

Brigadier General Theodore Marley “Ham” Brooks was an accomplished attorney. Like Monk, Ham was present in the majority of novels.

“Ham was designated on formal occasions. Slender, waspy, quick-moving, Ham looked what he was – a quick thinker and possibly the most astute lawyer Harvard ever turned out. He carried a plain black cane – never went anywhere without it. This was, among other things, a sword cane.”” — The Man of Bronze

For all Monk had to do to get Ham’s goat was laugh at him. It had all started back in the war, when Ham was Brigadier General Theodore Marley Brooks. The brigadier general had been the moving spirit in a little scheme to teach Monk certain French words which had a meaning entirely different than Monk thought. As a result, Monk had spent a session in the guardhouse for some things he had innocently called a French general.
A few days after that, though, Brigadier General Theodore Marley Brooks was suddenly hauled up before a courtmartial, accused of stealing hams. And convicted! Somebody had expertly planted plenty of evidence.
Ham got his name right there. And to this day he had not been able to prove it was the homely Monk who framed him. That rankled Ham’s lawyer soul. — The Man of Bronze