The Generic Doc Savage Title

Aug 26, 2012 by

The Generic Doc Savage Title

If you are 15 years old, and really bored, you may decide to count the words used in Doc Savage titles.

You may hide this from your mother who finds you a bit too obsessed with the books in the first place.

Years later, with the advent of inexpensive home computers you check your work. You decide that you were pretty close. Not bad for a bored 15 year-old.

What had you found? Well, the most used word is the. This isn’t a big suprise since most books started with the. How many? 119 with 13 serving their place in the middle of titles.

As a matter of fact, there are 599 total words in the Doc Savage titles (counting hypenated words as 1 each, of course) and 37 words occur at least 3 times. Still with me? After “the” the (are you trying to say this out loud?) next most used word is of(26). That’s no suprise, but it’s followed by Death(13), Terror(12), and some form of Devil(11). The others used 5 or more times are: Man(9), Men(6), Black(6), in(6), Island or Isle(6), Fear(5), and Mystery(5).

I guess the generic Doc Savage title would be: “The Terror Death” or “Terror of the Death Devil”. Wait, I kinda like that last one. Wasn’t that the May ’36 issue?

You say you want to see all the words?
Wordle: DocSavage.Org Doc Savage Title

Originally published sometime in the late 90s.

DC Doc Savage Comic Completes Run with Digital Release

Jul 5, 2012 by

DC Doc Savage Comic Completes Run with Digital Release

Hate it (most everyone) or love it (who are you?), the 2010-2011 DC Doc Savage comic came to a crashing halt with a digital only release of the final issue. Doc Savage Number 18 is available at ComiXology for the fair price of $1.99.

What happened to the First Wave Doc Savage?

I was listening to an interview with Brian Azarello recently – he was ‘in charge’ of the First Wave line – and basically summed up his position on the demise of First Wave by saying: “I guess people just weren’t as interested in reading about these characters as we thought they would be.”

I like a lot of Brian’s writing, and had all of First Wave been written at the level or the mini-series, I would have kept buying the series, but it wasn’t, and what kind of tics me off is that his comment is more than a little disingenuous, because they didn’t give us the characters, they gave us revisions and proxies for them – which can be fine if you improve on the original concept, but for me none of these (except, as noted The Avenger backups) were interesting enough reads. — Schnitzy Pretzelpants, Comic Book Resources

Hidalgo Trading Company readers disliked the comic from the start and, while some thought it got better with a new writer/artist team, it just died on the pulp vine.

If you must read the complete run, it’ll cost you a bit less than $36 for the digital versions.

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Mark Golden Addresses Canon and Comics

Sep 14, 2009 by

Editor’s Note: For over 10 years and 20,000+ messages, the Flearun group has discussed all that is Doc Savage. From plots, themes, authors, illustrators, to what is, and is not, canon. Recently, news of Doc Savage at a central part of a new DC comic series sparked discussion about comics changing the beloved character. Member Mark J. Golden had a well-written take that he agreed to republish here…

This, of course is not unique to Doc Savage.

Think of some of the other immortal, even iconic figures in popular fiction. Then go back to their original sources.

Frankenstein is the most obvious example. Say the name, people think immediately of Boris Karloff’s brilliant portrayal on film in Jack Pearce make up (or some derivation thereof) … even though Frankenstein is the scientist, not his creation. Who is referred to as “the creature” and not a monster. And far from the inarticulate being with a damaged brain so characteristic of most people’s imaginations, this creature actually taught himself to read, write and speak, and is the narrator of a good part of the original book.

Likewise Tarzan. Self taught. literate and articulate in the Burrough’s original. How often has THAT been carried forward into comics or film?.

Sherlock Holmes … until the very literal productions with Jeremy Brett on PBS, there were many, many truly excellent on screen presentations and comics that had little or no resemblance to the characters or settings in the book. Even the “classic” Rathbone/Bruce duo is NOTHING like anything Conan Doyle ever penned.

And I could go on on and on . . .

The problem (IMHO) with Doc Savage is that he has never really caught on in any form OTHER than the original novels … and even there, limited to an intensely loyal but relatively small readership. So anything different from that conception is provocatively obvious. Really fine writers like Will Murray who truly understand and love and breath the essence of the original can write new adventures in the original media (novels) that rise above mere imitation. But give Doc to a truly gifted writer who feels less constrained with the original vision (for example, Philip Jose Farmer) and you get “Escape from Loki.” It is arguably a better written novel than anything Dent and team ever wrote. But it is a brilliant PJF novel, with little or no resemblance to the original in tone, nature, character or any other attribute. I suspect that even further straying from the source will inevitably occur with ANY foray into a new media for Doc Savage.

I truly wish that someone, somewhere would create a film or comic that tells the story of Frankenstein, or the Phantom of the Opera, or Tarzan, the way their creators told their stories. And I wait in vein. In most cases, thriving careers in other media have supplanted and replaced the original, literary creation altogether. IF Doc ever makes the leap into mass market awareness in some media other than novels, I suspect it is inevitable that it will be a different Doc. Maybe better. Maybe worse. Certainly different.

(Even the Street and Smith Doc Savage comics of the 30s/40s, produced contemporaneously with the original novels, with the involvement if not approval of the same folks producing the pulps … you can truly say of thej that “Any resemblance of the persons and characters in this book to other literary characters of the same name is purely coincidence. “)

Mark J. Golden, CAE

L’homme de bronze

Aug 13, 2009 by




L’homme de bronze!

Original title Marabout translations Re-translation in English
The Man of Bronze L’homme de bronze The man of bronze
The Thousand-Headed Man L’homme aux mille têtes The thousand-headed man
Meteor Menace La grande terreur The great terror
The Polar Treasure Le trésor polaire The polar treasure
Brand of the Werewolf La marque de la bête The brand of the beast
The Lost Oasis L’oasis perdue The lost oasis
The Monsters Les monstres The monsters
The Land of Terror Le pays de l’épouvante The land of terror
The Phantom City La cité fantôme The ghost/phantom city
The Mystic Mullah La mort verte The green death
Fear Cay L’île de l’angoisse The island of anguish
The Quest of Qui À la poursuite du Quâr Chasing Quâr
The Fantastic Island La fosse aux monstres The monsters’ pit-den
Murder Melody La mélodie de la mort Death melody
The Spook Legion La légion fantôme The ghost legion
Land of Always-Night Le pays de l’éternelle nuit Land of eternal night
Red Skull Le crâne rouge The red skull
The Sargasso Ogre L’ogre des Sargasses The Sargasso ogre
The Secret in the sky Alerte dans le ciel Alert in the sky
The Pirate of the Pacific Le pirate du Pacifique The pirate of the Pacific
Cold Death La mort froide The cold death
The Czar of Fear Les cagoules vertes The green hoods
The Green Eagle Le secret de l’aigle The eagle’s secret
The Devil’s Playground Les guerriers du diable The Devil’s warriors
The Other World L’autre monde The other world
The Annihilist Le destructeur The destroyer
Mystery Under the Sea Le mystère sous la mer The mystery under the sea
Mad eyes Les yeux du mal Eyes of evil
Resurrection Day La trahison de la momie The mummy’s betrayal
Red Snow La neige rouge The red snow
The Dagger in the Sky Le poignard céleste The celestial dagger
World Fair’s Goblin Les mystères de New York New York’s mysteries
Merchants of Disaster Les marchands de désastre The merchants of disaster
The Man who Shook the Earth L’homme qui ébranla la terre The man who shook the Earth
The Gold Ogre L’ogre d’or The gold ogre
The Sea Magician Le magicien de la mer The sea magician
The Feathered Octopus La Pieuvre-Oiseau The octopus-bird
meaning The winged octopus
The Sea Angel L’Ange des océans The sea Angel
Devil on the Moon Le diable sur la lune The devil on the moon
The Mental Wizard Magie mentale Mental magic
Original title Lefranqc translations Re-translation in English
Singles
The Man of Bronze L’homme de bronze The man of bronze
The Land of Terror Le pays de l’épouvante The land of terror
The Mystery on the Snow Le mystère dans la neige The mystery in the snow
(first translation in French)
Omnis
The Man of Bronze L’homme de bronze The man of bronze
The Land of Terror Le pays de l’épouvante The land of terror
Quest of the Spider A la poursuite de l’araignée Chasing the spider
(first translation in French)
The Polar Treasure Le trésor polaire The polar treasure
Pirate of the Pacific Le pirate du Pacifique The pirate of the Pacific
The Red Skull Le crâne rouge The red skull
The Lost Oasis L’oasis perdue The lost oasis
The Sargasso Ogre L’ogre des Sargasses The Sargasso ogre
The Czar of Fear Le Czar de la peur The Czar of fear
(new translation of title)
The Phantom City La cité fantôme The ghost/phantom city
Brand of the Werewolf La marque de la bête The brand of the beast
The Man Who Shook the Earth L’homme qui ébranla la terre The man who shook the Earth
Special series
Bleeding Sun Le soleil sanglant The bleeding sun
Special Thanks to Catherine Lavallée-Welch for this page and all the work it took to translate the titles in English. Merci!

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1949

May 16, 1979 by

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