Pat Savage Stars in Solo (Almost) Novel

Oct 16, 2016 by

Pat Savage Stars in Solo (Almost) Novel

patsavageWill Murray decided to give many fans what they wanted and has penned a solo Pat Savage novel. Well, almost solo, as Monk joins Pat on her adventure:

When a man so anemic that he could be a vampire’s victim comes to Patricia Savage for rescue, the impetuous girl can’t say no. Excitement is her meat and danger her dessert.

Accompanied by Doc Savage aide, Monk Mayfair, Pat finds herself in the worst danger of her life. Wanted for murder, hounded by the minions of a weird mystery figure calling himself Chief Standing Scorpion, narrowly evading the hordes of the Vinegarroon tribe, the bronze-skinned golden girl battles her way to a sinister secret cached in an ancient ruin.

From the oilfields of Oklahoma to the forbidding Ozark Mountains, the trail of scorpionic doom winds. Will Pat Savage’s first great adventure also be her last?

The novel was released in softcover, but no announcement has been made regarding hardcover or ebook versions.

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Roger Kastel

Oct 27, 2014 by

Roger Kastel

kastel1Roger Kastel painted a cover for Doc Savage Omnibus 3 and the poster for the film, Doc Savage: Man of Bronze.

While still a student Roger had his first paperback book cover published in the 1960’s by Pocket Books (Simon Schuster). All told, Roger estimates that he has done over a 1,000 illustrations for various publishers. Also in the 1960’s, a painting of Roger’s won first prize from the National Fire Underwriters. This painting was made into a fire safety poster that was used for many years and had high visibility.

By the 1970’s Roger Kastel hit full stride as an artist, becoming one of the most well respected illustrators in the business, working for every major publishing house in New York. — Roger Kastel


kastelDoc Savage study by Roger Kastel. Prints for sale at RogerKastel.com

Joe DeVito wrote: “Thank God I ran into an illustrator named Ralph Amatrudi, who was very well disciplined in the Riley method. Riley was a modern-day Howard Pyle and the mentor of many tremendous artists (James Bama, who revolutionized paperback cover art and made Doc Savage famous again, Roger Kastel, who painted Jaws, Bob McGuire, and many others).”

ds1Ron Ely as Doc Savage by Roger Kastel. Prints for sale at RogerKastel.com

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The Doc Savage Waiting Game

Mar 6, 2012 by

The Doc Savage Waiting Game

May 1933

For the sake of argument pretend you were born around 1920.

Now jump forward to when you turned 13. (Let’s say May 17, 1933.)

You’ve been buying each issue of the new Doc Savage Magazine as soon as it hits the newsstand. (Where are you getting the money? You sell Grit.)

You become successful. From Grit you graduate to the New York Times. Pretty soon you’re in college, but you never stop buying Doc Savage Magazine. They’re taking up room in the attic, but Mom loves to have something of yours at home.

You’re kinda sad when you buy the last issue just before your 29th birthday. You hoped to have a son and introduce him to the Fabulous Five.

Flash forward to 1964. You’re 44 and you do have a son. He’s 13 and he finds the Bantam copy of The Man of Bronze at Parrino’s Drugstore. He’s hooked!

After a few months you’re disappointed to find they’re not in the order you remember. You’d get out the old issues for the boy, but you threw them away when your wife convinced you to build her a sewing room in the attic.

You had the pool room downstairs. What could you say?

The years go by. Bantam re-releases Docs in something that looks like random order. Sometimes one a month…sometimes months between reissues. It’s OK. Your son doesn’t care what order as long as Bantam publishes them all. he’s a collector.

It’s October 1990. You’re 70. You’re on the porch with your grandson. He’s 13. (Amazing how that works.) He brings you a book he found at Hawley-Cooke. He remembered you and his Dad talking about the Man of Bronze. He’s found a copy of Doc Savage Omnibus #13.

You look over Up From Earth’s Center and get that feeling again. You tell your grandson it’s been over 40 years since you saw that story and you still remember it.

“Fourty-one years and three months, grandpa.” You’re happy the kid inherited his mother’s smarts. You think aloud, “I wonder what the longest it was between when a novel came out and when Bantam reprinted it?”

The next day your grandson gives you a printout. It’s a list of all the novels and the length of time between pulp publication and Bantam reprint publication.

“I figured it out for you Grandpa. You had to wait an average of 37 years and 8 months between the time a novel was first published and the time Bantam reprinted it.”

You give your grandson a funny look. Gas, but he misinterprets it.

He shows you the list. “See here Grandpa? The Green Eagle came out in July 1941 and Bantam reprinted it in May 1968. That’s 26 years and 10 months.”

“That would have been the shortest wait. The longest was Bequest of Evil. It was first printed in February 1941, but Bantam didn’t reprint it until June 1990.”

You look up, “That’s, uh, almost 50 years.”

“49 years and 5 months, grandpa. I put them all on that printout I gave you.”

You smile at the boy and think, “He’ll give up all this foolishness as soon as he discovers girls.”

Bantam # Magazine # Wait # Bantam Title Years Months
24 101 1 The Green Eagle 26 10
25 95 2 The Devil’s Playground 27 5
29 83 3 The Other World 28 9
30 76 4 The Flaming Falcons 29 5
23 68 5 Fortress of Solitude 29 6
37 81 6 Hex 29 7
40 82 7 The Dagger in the Sky 29 9
2 17 8 The Thousand-Headed Man 30 3
41 77 9 Merchants of Disaster 30 3
39 74 10 World’s Fair Goblin 30 4
42 75 11 The Gold Ogre 30 6
3 13 12 Meteor Menace 30 7
9 23 13 The Mystic Mullah 30 10
14 34 14 The Fantastic lsland 30 11
28 56 15 The Deadly Dwarf 30 11
12 29 16 Quest of Qui 31 0
7 14 17 The Monsters 31 2
15 33 18 Murder Melody 31 2
5 11 19 Brand of the Werewolf 31 3
21 43 20 Cold Death 31 4
57 79 21 Poison Island 31 5
13 25 22 Land of Always-Night 31 6
1 1 23 The Man of Bronze 31 7
6 7 24 The Lost Oasis 31 7
11 19 25 Fear Cay 31 8
4 4 26 The Polar Treasure 31 10
33 50 27 The Terror in the Navy 31 10
34 51 28 Mad Eyes 31 10
16 26 29 The Spook Legion 31 11
59 72 30 The Yellow Cloud 32 2
10 10 31 The Phantom City 32 3
8 2 32 The Land of Terror 32 4
50 61 33 Devil on the Moon 32 4
20 27 34 The Secret in the Sky 32 6
27 36 35 Mystery Under the Sea 32 6
36 45 36 Resurrection Day 32 6
56 65 37 The Giggling Ghosts 32 6
49 57 38 The Sea Angel 32 7
58 66 39 The Munitions Master 32 7
48 55 40 The Feathered Octopus 32 8
55 58 41 The Golden Peril 33 0
65 69 42 The Green Death 33 0
66 71 43 Mad Mesa 33 0
67 73 44 The Freckled Shark 33 0
63 64 45 The Submarine Mystery 33 2
32 32 46 Dust of Death 33 3
47 47 47 Land of Long Juju 33 3
62 62 48 The Pirate’s Ghost 33 3
54 53 49 He Could Stop the World 33 4
64 63 50 The Motion Menace 33 4
61 59 51 The Living Fire Menace 33 5
46 42 52 The Midas Man 33 7
53 49 53 The Mental Wizard 33 7
17 6 54 The Red Skull 33 9
18 8 55 The Sargasso Ogre 33 9
26 20 56 Death in Silver 33 9
52 46 57 The Vanisher 33 9
45 38 58 The Men Who Smiled No More 33 10
31 22 59 The Annihilist 34 0
19 5 60 Pirate of the Pacific 34 2
51 40 61 Haunted Ocean 34 2
22 9 62 The Czar of Fear 34 4
38 24 63 Red Snow 34 5
94 143 64 The Hate Genius 34 5
35 18 65 The Squeaking Goblin 34 8
44 21 66 The Sea Magician 35 2
78 78 67 The Crimson Serpent 35 2
98 146 68 Cargo Unknown 35 3
106 154 69 The Screaming Man 35 7
60 31 70 The Majii 35 8
97 141 71 Satan Black 35 8
43 12 72 The Man Who Shook the Earth 35 10
100 142 73 The Lost Giant 35 10
79 70 74 The Devil Genghis 35 11
82 86 75 The Evil Gnome 36 1
96 125 76 Mystery on Happy Bones 36 3
74 48 77 The Derrick Devil 36 5
75 52 78 The Land of Fear 36 5
81 80 79 The Stone Man 36 5
85 87 80 The Boss of Terror 36 6
101 136 81 The Pharaoh’s Ghost 36 7
104 137 82 The Man Who Was Scared 36 9
71 35 83 Murder Mirage 36 10
72 37 84 The Metal Master 36 10
73 39 85 The Seven Agate Devils 36 10
86 84 86 The Angry Ghost 36 11
87 85 87 The Spotted Men 37 0
103 134 88 The Whisker of Hercules 37 0
107 140 89 Jin San 37 0
70 30 90 Spook Hole 37 1
99 127 91 Hell Below 37 1
90 89 92 The Flying Goblin 37 2
77 44 93 The South Pole Terror 37 4
109 138 94 The Shape of Terror 37 5
76 41 95 The Black Spot 37 9
114 145 96 The Ten-Ton Snakes 37 9
83 67 97 The Red Terrors 37 10
91 91 98 The Purple Dragon 37 10
110 132 99 Death Had Yellow Eyes 37 11
130 178 100 The Swooning Lady 37 11
102 119 101 The Time Terror 38 0
129 177 102 The Angry Canary 38 1
69 15 103 The Mystery on the Snow 38 2
92 88 104 The Awful Egg 38 4
111 131 105 One-Eyed Mystic 38 5
93 90 106 Tunnel Terror 38 6
84 60 107 The Mountain Monster 38 7
108 121 108 The Black, Black Witch 38 7
105 117 109 They Died Twice 38 8
68 3 110 Quest of the Spider 39 0
113 123 111 The Talking Devil 39 7
142 175 112 The Pure Evil 39 7
89 54 113 The Magic Island 39 10
112 113 114 The Man Who Fell Up 39 11
147 174 115 I Died Yesterday 40 1
146 173 116 Once Over Lightly 40 3
145 172 117 Let’s Kill Ames 40 5
144 171 118 The Monkey Suit 40 7
80 16 119 The King Maker 40 8
143 170 120 No Light to Die By 40 9
116 112 121 The Speaking Stone 41 0
115 111 122 Pirate Isle 41 1
120 122 123 The King of Terror 41 2
134 152 124 The Thing That Pursued 41 3
182 181 125 Up From Earth’s Center 41 3
126 129 126 The Secret of the Su 41 4
125 128 127 The Goblins 41 5
136 155 128 Measures for a Coffin 41 5
133 149 129 King Joe Cay 41 6
181 180 130 Return From Cormoral 41 6
119 116 131 The Laugh of Death 41 8
151 166 132 The Disappearing Lady 41 8
155 169 133 Danger Lies East 41 8
180 179 134 The Green Master 41 9
88 28 135 The Roar Devil 41 11
122 115 136 The Fiery Menace 42 1
150 161 137 Fire and Ice 42 1
118 106 138 Peril in the North 42 2
121 114 139 The Three Wild Men 42 2
138 144 140 Strange Fish 42 4
141 147 141 Rock Sinister 42 5
179 176 142 Terror Wears No Shoes 42 5
154 158 143 Five Fathoms Dead 42 7
117 98 144 The Golden Man 42 10
137 135 145 The Three Devils 43 1
128 124 146 The Running Skeletons 43 2
172 165 147 The Devil Is Jones 43 3
159 153 148 Trouble on Parade 43 4
176 168 149 The Death Lady 43 4
153 148 150 The Terrible Stork 43 5
175 167 151 Target for Death 43 5
124 100 152 The Headless Men 43 6
135 130 153 The Spook of Grandpa Eben 43 6
170 162 154 Three Times a Corpse 43 6
167 157 155 Terror and the Lonely Widow 43 8
169 160 156 Colors for Murder 43 8
174 164 157 Death in Little Houses 43 8
171 159 158 Death is a Round Black Spot 43 9
177 163 159 The Exploding Lake 43 9
163 151 160 Terror Takes 7 43 10
162 150 161 The Wee Ones 43 11
168 156 162 Se-Pah-Poo 44 0
123 92 163 Devils of the Deep 44 2
158 139 164 Weird Valley 44 6
132 107 165 The Rustling Death 45 0
131 103 166 The Mindless Monsters 45 4
127 97 167 The All-White Elf 45 5
156 126 168 The Mental Monster 45 7
140 108 169 Men of Fear 45 8
139 102 170 Mystery Island 46 2
149 110 171 The Magic Forest 46 4
178 133 172 The Derelict of Skull Shoal 46 7
165 120 173 Waves of Death 46 9
164 118 174 The Devil’s Black Rock 46 11
160 105 175 The Invisible-Box Murders 47 8
166 109 176 The Too-Wise Owl 47 8
148 93 177 The Awful Dynasty 47 9
161 104 178 Birds of Death 47 9
157 99 179 The Pink Lady 47 10
152 94 180 The Men Vanished 47 11
173 96 181 Bequest of Evil 49 4

Originally published on DocSavage.Info and one of the many early incarnations of the Hidalgo Trading Company

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Lester Dent Short Video Biography

Jan 6, 2010 by

Lester Dent Short Video Biography


A 2-minute film about Missouri pulp author Lester Dent, creator of Doc Savage. Third place winner in the Columbia Missouri 2007 Gimme Truth contest.

Interesting super-short documentary from a couple of years ago. See which Doc Savage fans you recognize from the final few seconds…

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Novel Submission Order

Aug 2, 2009 by

Novel Submission Order

Doc Savage fans are a particular lot. Some have read the novels in the order they were published by Bantam. Some insist a better method is to read them in the order they were originally published. The latest “best order” is to read the novels in the order they were “submitted to Street and Smith.” Guess who has that order for you?

Year
# Mag Title
1932
001 The Man of Bronze
1933
002 The Land of Terror
003 Quest of the Spider
004 The Polar Treasure
005 Pirate of the Pacific
006 The Red Skull
007 The Lost Oasis
008 The Sargasso Ogre
009 The Czar of Fear
010 The Phantom City
011 Brand of the Werewolf
012 The Man Who Shook the Earth
013 Meteor Menace
014 The Monsters
015 The Mystery on the Snow
1934
016 The King Maker
017 The Thousand-Headed Man
018 The Squeaking Goblin
019 Fear Cay
020 Death in Silver
021 The Sea Magician
022 The Annihilist
023 The Mystic Mullah
024 Red Snow
025 Land of Always-Night
026 The Spook Legion
027 The Secret in the Sky
1935
028 Spook Hole
029 The Roar Devil
030 Quest of Qui
031 Cold Death
032 The Majii
033 Mystery Under the Sea
034 Murder Melody
035 The Fantastic lsland
036 Dust of Death
037 The Seven Agate Devils
038 Murder Mirage
039 The Midas Man
040 The Black Spot
041 The Men Who Smiled No More
042 The Metal Master
043 Haunted Ocean
044 The South Pole Terror
045 Land of Long Juju
046 The Vanisher
047 Mad Eyes
048 He Could Stop the World
049 The Terror in the Navy
050 The Derrick Devil
1936
051 The Mental Wizard
052 The Land of Fear
053 Resurrection Day
054 Repel
055 The Motion Menace
056 Ost
057 The Sea Angel
1937
058 Devil on the Moon
059 The Golden Peril
060 The Feathered Octopus
061 The Living Fire Menace
062 The Mountain Monster
063 The Pirate’s Ghost
064 The Red Terrors
065 The Submarine Mystery
1938
066 The Giggling Ghosts
067 The Munitions Master
068 Fortress of Solitude
069 The Devil Genghis
070 The Green Death
071 Mad Mesa
072 The Yellow Cloud
073 Merchants of Disaster
074 The Freckled Shark
075 World’s Fair Goblin
076 The Gold Ogre
1939
077 The Flaming Falcons
078 The Crimson Serpent
079 Hex
080 Poison Island
081 The Stone Man
082 The Angry Ghost
083 The Dagger in the Sky
084 The Other World
085 The Spotted Men
086 The Evil Gnome
087 The Boss of Terror
088 The Flying Goblin
1940
089 The Purple Dragon
090 Tunnel Terror
091 The Awful Egg
092 The Headless Men
093 The Awful Dynasty
094 Devils of the Deep
095 The Men Vanished
096 The Devil’s Playground
097 Bequest of Evil
098 The All-White Elf
099 The Golden Man
100 The Pink Lady
101 The Magic Forest
102 The Mindless Monsters
103 The Rustling Death
104 The Green Eagle
105 Mystery Island
1941
106 Birds of Death
107 Peril in the North
108 The Invisible-Box Murders
109 Men of Fear
110 The Man Who Fell Up
111 The Too-Wise Owl
112 Pirate Isle
113 The Speaking Stone
1942
114 The Three Wild Men
115 The Fiery Menace
116 The Laugh of Death
117 They Died Twice
118 The Devil’s Black Rock
119 The Time Terror
120 The Talking Devil
121 Waves of Death
122 The King of Terror
123 The Black, Black Witch
124 The Running Skeletons
125 Mystery on Happy Bones
1943
126 The Goblins
127 The Mental Monster
128 Hell Below
129 The Secret of the Su
130 The Spook of Grandpa Eben
131 The Whisker of Hercules
132 According to Plan of a One-Eyed Mystic
133 Death Had Yellow Eyes
134 The Derelict of Skull Shoal
135 The Three Devils
136 The Pharaoh’s Ghost
1944
137 The Man Who Was Scared
138 The Shape of Terror
139 Weird Valley
140 Jin San
141 Satan Black
142 The Lost Giant
143 Violent Night
144 Strange Fish
145 The Ten-Ton Snakes
146 Cargo Unknown
147 Rock Sinister
148 The Terrible Stork
149 King Joe Cay
1945
150 The Wee Ones
151 Terror Takes 7
152 The Thing That Pursued
153 Trouble on Parade
154 The Screaming Man
155 Measures for a Coffin
156 Se-Pah-Poo
157 Terror and the Lonely Widow
158 Five Fathoms Dead
159 Death is a Round Black Spot
160 Colors for Murder
1946
161 Fire and Ice
162 Three Times a Corpse
163 The Exploding Lake
164 Death in Little Houses
165 The Devil Is Jones
166 The Disappearing Lady
167 Target for Death
168 Danger Lies East
169 The Death Lady
170 No Light to Die By
171 The Monkey Suit
1947
172 Let’s Kill Ames
173 Once Over Lightly
174 I Died Yesterday
175 The Pure Evil
176 Terror Wears No Shoes
1948
177 The Angry Canary
178 The Swooning Lady
179 In Hell, Madonna
180 The Green Master
181 Return From Cormoral
1949
182 Up From Earth’s Center

Originally published on the Hidalgo Trading Company and DocSavage.Info

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Lester Dent’s Secret Master Plot

Aug 1, 2009 by

Lester Dent’s Secret Master Plot

This is a formula, a master plot, for any 6000 word pulp story. It has worked on adventure, detective, western and war-air. It tells exactly where to put everything. It shows definitely just what must happen in each successive thousand words. No yarn of mine written to the formula has yet failed to sell. The business of building stories seems not much different from the business of building anything else.

Lester DentHere’s how it starts:

1. A DIFFERENT MURDER METHOD FOR VILLAIN TO USE
2. A DIFFERENT THING FOR VILLAIN TO BE SEEKING
3. A DIFFERENT LOCALE
4. A MENACE WHICH IS TO HANG LIKE A CLOUD OVER HERO

One of these DIFFERENT things would be nice, two better, three swell. It may help if they are fully in mind before tackling the rest.

A different murder method could be–different. Thinking of shooting, knifing, hydrocyanic, garroting, poison needles, scorpions, a few others, and writing them on paper gets them where they may suggest something. Scorpions and their poison bite? Maybe mosquitos or flies treated with deadly germs?

If the victims are killed by ordinary methods, but found under strange and identical circumstances each time, it might serve, the reader of course not knowing until the end, that the method of murder is ordinary. Scribes who have their villain’s victims found with butterflies, spiders or bats stamped on them could conceivably be flirting with this gag. Probably it won’t do a lot of good to be too odd, fanciful or grotesque with murder methods.

The different thing for the villain to be after might be something other than jewels, the stolen bank loot, the pearls, or some other old ones. Here, again one might get too bizarre.

Unique locale? Easy. Selecting one that fits in with the murder method and the treasure–thing that villain wants–makes it simpler, and it’s also nice to use a familiar one, a place where you’ve lived or worked. So many pulpateers don’t. It sometimes saves embarrassment to know nearly as much about the locale as the editor, or enough to fool him.

Here’s a nifty much used in faking local color. For a story laid in Egypt, say, author finds a book titled “Conversational Egyptian Easily Learned,” or something like that. He wants a character to ask in Egyptian, “What’s the matter?” He looks in the book and finds, “El khabar, eyh?” To keep the reader from getting dizzy, it’s perhaps wise to make it clear in some fashion, just what that means. Occasionally the text will tell this, or someone can repeat it in English. But it’s a doubtful move to stop and tell the reader in so many words the English translation.

The writer learns they have palm trees in Egypt. He looks in the book, finds the Egyptian for palm trees, and uses that. This kids editors and readers into thinking he knows something about Egypt.

Lester DentHere’s the second installment of the master plot.

Divide the 6000 word yarn into four 1500 word parts. In each 1500 word part, put the following:

FIRST 1500 WORDS

1–First line, or as near thereto as possible, introduce the hero and swat him with a fistful of trouble. Hint at a mystery, a menace or a problem to be solved–something the hero has to cope with.
2–The hero pitches in to cope with his fistful of trouble. (He tries to fathom the mystery, defeat the menace, or solve the problem.)
3–Introduce ALL the other characters as soon as possible. Bring them on in action.
4–Hero’s endevours land him in an actual physical conflict near the end of the first 1500 words.
5–Near the end of first 1500 words, there is a complete surprise twist in the plot development.

SO FAR: Does it have SUSPENSE? Is there a MENACE to the hero? Does everything happen logically?

At this point, it might help to recall that action should do something besides advance the hero over the scenery. Suppose the hero has learned the dastards of villains have seized somebody named Eloise, who can explain the secret of what is behind all these sinister events. The hero corners villains, they fight, and villains get away. Not so hot.

Hero should accomplish something with his tearing around, if only to rescue Eloise, and surprise! Eloise is a ring-tailed monkey. The hero counts the rings on Eloise’s tail, if nothing better comes to mind. They’re not real. The rings are painted there. Why?

Lester DentSECOND 1500 WORDS

1–Shovel more grief onto the hero.
2–Hero, being heroic, struggles, and his struggles lead up to:
3–Another physical conflict.
4–A surprising plot twist to end the 1500 words.

NOW: Does second part have SUSPENSE? Does the MENACE grow like a black cloud? Is the hero getting it in the neck? Is the second part logical?

DON’T TELL ABOUT IT***

Show how the thing looked. This is one of the secrets of writing; never tell the reader–show him. (He trembles, roving eyes, slackened jaw, and such.) MAKE THE READER SEE HIM.

When writing, it helps to get at least one minor surprise to the printed page. It is reasonable to to expect these minor surprises to sort of inveigle the reader into keeping on. They need not be such profound efforts.

One method of accomplishing one now and then is to be gently misleading. Hero is examining the murder room. The door behind him begins slowly to open. He does not see it. He conducts his examination blissfully. Door eases open, wider and wider, until–surprise! The glass pane falls out of the big window across the room. It must have fallen slowly, and air blowing into the room caused the door to open. Then what the heck made the pane fall so slowly? More mystery. Characterizing a story actor consists of giving him some things which make him stick in the reader’s mind.

TAG HIM. BUILD YOUR PLOTS SO THAT ACTION CAN BE CONTINUOUS.

Lester DentTHIRD 1500 WORDS

1–Shovel the grief onto the hero.
2–Hero makes some headway, and corners the villain or somebody in:
3–A physical conflict.
4–A surprising plot twist, in which the hero preferably gets it in the neck bad, to end the 1500 words.

DOES: It still have SUSPENSE? The MENACE getting blacker? The hero finds himself in a hell of a fix? It all happens logically?

These outlines or master formulas are only something to make you certain of inserting some physical conflict, and some genuine plot twists, with a little suspense and menace thrown in. Without them, there is no pulp story.

These physical conflicts in each part might be DIFFERENT, too. If one fight is with fists, that can take care of the pugilism until next the next yarn. Same for poison gas and swords. There may, naturally, be exceptions. A hero with a peculiar punch, or a quick draw, might use it more than once. The idea is to avoid monotony.

ACTION: Vivid, swift, no words wasted. Create suspense, make the reader see and feel the action.
ATMOSPHERE: Hear, smell, see, feel and taste.
DESCRIPTION: Trees, wind, scenery and water.

THE SECRET OF ALL WRITING IS TO MAKE EVERY WORD COUNT.

Lester DentFOURTH 1500 WORDS

1–Shovel the difficulties more thickly upon the hero.
2–Get the hero almost buried in his troubles. (Figuratively, the villain has him prisoner and has him framed for a murder rap; the girl is presumably dead, everything is lost, and the DIFFERENT murder method is about to dispose of the suffering protagonist.)
3–The hero extricates himself using HIS OWN SKILL, training or brawn.
4–The mysteries remaining–one big one held over to this point will help grip interest–are cleared up in course of final conflict as hero takes the situation in hand.
5–Final twist, a big surprise, (This can be the villain turning out to be the unexpected person, having the “Treasure” be a dud, etc.)
6–The snapper, the punch line to end it.

HAS: The SUSPENSE held out to the last line? The MENACE held out to the last? Everything been explained? It all happen logically? Is the Punch Line enough to leave the reader with that WARM FEELING? Did God kill the villain? Or the hero?

The End

Lester DentFrom: Jason A. Wolcott Newsgroups: alt.fan.doc-savage,alt.pulp Subject: Lester Dent’s Master Plot Date: Fri, 13 Oct 1995 09:20:29 -0500 Uploaded by Jason A. Wolcott, from Marilyn Cannaday’s biography of Lester Dent, “Bigger Than Life: the Creator of Doc Savage.” (c) 1990 Bowling Green State University Popular Press. Original publication circa 1950s

Published on the Original Hidalgo Trading Company in this format sometime in the late 90s.

Seriously, who remembers the exact date these days?

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