Walter Swenson

Feb 25, 2018 by

Walter Swenson

Though Walter Swenson (also credited as H. Swenson and Swenson) painted 11 covers for Doc Savage Magazine and some illustrations for Astounding, little is currently written about the artist. He is not listed at David Saunders’s PulpArtists.Com.

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Modest Stein

Feb 24, 2018 by

Modest Stein

Modest Stein Self-Portrait

“Modest Stein (1871–1958), born Modest Aronstam, was a Russian-born American illustrator and close associate of the anarchists Alexander Berkman and Emma Goldman. He was Berkman’s cousin and intended replacement in the attempted assassination of Henry Clay Frick, an industrialist and union buster, in 1892. Later Stein abandoned active anarchism and became a successful newspaper, pulp magazine, and book illustrator…” — Wikipedia.

Read more about Stein at PulpArtists.com

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Walter Baumhofer

Feb 24, 2018 by

Walter Baumhofer

The first artist to paint Doc Savage’s portrait, Walter M. Baumhofer (November 1, 1904 to September 23, 1987) painted numerous covers for the pulp editions of Doc Savage Magazine.

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John L. Nanovic

Feb 24, 2018 by

John L. Nanovic

John Nanovic, 1929

John Nanovic, 1929


Credited with co-creating Doc Savage, John Leonard Nanovic (October 6, 1906 – February 9, 2001) was the magazine’s first editor.

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Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze 1975

Feb 23, 2018 by

Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze 1975

From the pressbook

Trivia:

1) Principal photography was January 23, 1974 to April 5, 1974

2) Hollywood Reporter listed that voice actor Daws Butler was cast as the “voice” of Habeas Corpus. Butler wasn’t given screen credit.

3) Habeas Corpus was played by the trained pig “Mr. Hawg.” It was his only credit. Warner Bros. Rambling Reporter (Mar 1974) noted the pig was fed bacon, eggs, and ham sandwiches on set. The shock of the cannibalism must have been the reason for Hawg’s sole movie credit.

4) The film’s IMDB link: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072886/

5) From the official Doc Savage Pressbook: “High adventure, suspense and laughter all compine to make “DOC SAVAGE…The Man of Bronze” a real audience pleaser. The trailer that has been prepared by arner Bros. is also an audience pleaser and will bring them back to the theatre in droves when you open the film. Make sure this trailer gets lots of playoing time; you’ll be happy you did. Order it from National Screen Service.”

6) Either Dar Robinson (stuntman) or William Katt (star of The Greatest American Hero) plays the uncredited assassin who shoots at Doc to open the adventure.

7) The film opens in 1936, and the movie playing at the theater near Doc’s headquarters is “Captain Blood” starting Errol Flynn and Oliva de Havilland. The film was released in New York City on December 26, 1935. The film ends during the Christmas season. Most likely intended to be Christmas 1936.

8) The portrait of Clark Savage, Sr. is Ely wearing a vintage safari outfit and pith helmet, with a handlebar mustache.

9) The “Eastern Cranmoor Building” was played by the Eastern Columbia Building is Los Angeles.

10) Variety panned the film in their review, but had kind words for newcomer Pamela Hensley “Only thesp who survives the script with any dignity is Pamela Hensley, playing a native girl in love with the stolid hero.” (Oddly, the online review is dated December 1974 though the film wasn’t released until June 1975)

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