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column 006 09/33 The Lost Oasis column
 

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While seeking to solve the mystery of " the trained vampire murders," Doc Savage and his amazing crew suddenly find themselves prisoners of Sol Yuttal and Hadi-Mot aboard a hijacked Zeppelin. Their deadly destination is a fabulous lost diamond mine guarded by carnivorous plants and monstrous, bloodsucking bats.




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Note: Comments may contain spoilers.

Scott Kimball

I first read this book when I was about 12. 25 years later, I read it again and enjoyed it even more. Kept my interest the whole way through with appropriately odd villians, killer bats, and hand to hand combat with fearless knife-wielding tribal warriors aboard a mysterious zeppelin. The description of the lost oasis itself really gave me a vicarious thrill of actually discovering someplace truly incredible for myself. Thumbs way up for this one.

- | - July 10, 2003 07:36 PM

Scott Kimball

I first read this book when I was about 12. 25 years later, I read it again and enjoyed it even more. Kept my interest the whole way through with appropriately odd villians, killer bats, and hand to hand combat with fearless knife-wielding tribal warriors aboard a mysterious zeppelin. The description of the lost oasis itself really gave me a vicarious thrill of actually discovering someplace truly incredible for myself. Thumbs way up for this one.

- | - July 10, 2003 07:37 PM

Barry Ellis

Loved the bats & the greasy bad guys! The first, and perhaps the best, of the "Doc-in-a-dirgible" stories.

- | - July 21, 2003 08:08 PM

Howard Hopkins

Loved this one! The scene on the wharf with the fluttering death was excellent. Great story, great villains.

- | - July 30, 2003 02:23 AM

Gary

Doc Savage - Mass Murderer? And the slaves who dug up the diamonds didn't get a share?? Marvellous!

- | - November 27, 2003 04:41 PM

Paul Cook

This book is in my top five Docs. It has all the elements we love in a Doc Savage story, plus the extra added element of hijacking a Zeppelin. I read this when I was about 16 (in 1967) and I really got a feel for the Great Depression in New York, and the action is literally non-stop. Oddly, when I read Clive Cussler's Sahara a few years ago, I thought he might have ripped off the central conceit of this story: a diamond mine in the middle of the Sahara Desert. (I haven't seen the movie yet, being a Doc loyalist.) Of course the name "Dirk Pitt" does have the same pulpish ring as "Doc Savage", but NOBODY does it better than Doc. Nobody.

- | - May 26, 2005 03:03 AM

Lee Dorrance

Fascinating, that's the only word I can us to describe The Lost Oasis. It illicited memories of the Valley of the Vanished for me as Doc and the crew smuggle aboard the dirigible headed for a then unknown, exotic locale. Pure Doc at it's finest.

- | - June 17, 2005 05:21 PM

Mark Carpenter

Books like "The Lost Oasis" are why we're still talking about Doc Savage some 70 years later. What a blast! The last half of this little masterpiece has more action, suspense and thrills than anything writers are putting out today. What's more fun than a knife fight on a zeppelin...and what other Doc novel has a better villain death scene than this one? An absolute banquet for any Doc fan.

If the entire series had been as good as "The Lost Oasis," Dent would be mentioned in the same company as Dickens, Arthur Conan Doyle and Jules Verne.

- | - May 21, 2006 08:30 AM

Ryan Harvey

If I had to select one Doc Savage story to hook a new reader, this would be the one. It's deleriously fast-paced, inventive, and full-on nuts. I can't imagine there's anyone who wouldn't find this thrilling. It's works like this that made the pulps what they are.

- | - July 30, 2006 10:32 PM


   
   

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