Doc Savage on the Radio

Chuck Welch
July 31, 2009 - radio

Doc Savage made it to the radio three times: 1934-35, 1943, and 1985. Below is a list of the episodes culled from numerous sources.

1934-35 episodes were 15 minutes each and were written by Lester Dent.

Episode Date Title
1 02/10/1934 The Red Death
2 02/17/1934 The Golden Legacy
3 02/24/1934 The Red Lake Quest
4 03/03/1934 The Sniper in The Sky
5 03/10/1934 The Evil Extortionists
6 03/17/1934 Black-Light Magic
7 03/24/1934 Radium Scramble
8 03/31/1934 Death Had Blue Hands
9 04/07/1934 The Sinister Sleep
10 04/14/1934 The Southern Star Mystery
11 04/21/1934 The Impossible Bullet
12 04/28/1934 The Too-talkative Parrot
13 05/05/1934 The Blue Angel
14 05/12/1934 The Green Ghost
15 05/19/1934 The Box of Fear
16 05/26/1934 The Phantom Terror
17 06/02/1934 Mantrap Mesa
18 06/09/1934 Fast Workers
19 06/16/1934 Needle in a Chinese Haystack
20 06/23/1934 Monk Called it Justice
21 06/30/1934 The White Haired Devil
22 07/07/1934 The Oilfield Ogres
23 07/14/1934 The Fainting Lady
24 07/21/1934 Poison Cargo
25 07/28/1934 Find Curley Morgan
26 08/04/1934 The Growing Wizard

Episodes 27-52 were repeats of the 1934 episodes.

The 1943 episodes were 30 minutes long.

Episode Date Title
53 01/06/1943 Doc Savage
54 01/13/1943 Return From Death
55 01/20/1943 Note of Death
56 01/27/1943 Murder Charm
57 02/03/1943 Death Stalks The Morgue
58 02/10/1943 I’ll Dance On Your Grave
59 02/17/1943 Murder Is a Business
60 02/24/1943 Living Evil
61 03/03/1943 Journey Into Oblivion
62 03/10/1943 Hour of Murder
63 03/17/1943 Pharaoh’s Wisdom
64 03/24/1943 Society Amazonia
65 03/31/1943 Insect Menace
66 04/07/1943 Subway to Hell
67 04/14/1943 Monster of The Sea
68 04/21/1943 The Voice That Cried ‘Kill!’
69 04/28/1943 Cult of Satan
70 05/05/1943 When Dead Men Walk
71 05/12/1943 The Screeching Ghost
72 05/19/1943 Ransom or Death
73 05/26/1943 Murder Man
74 06/02/1943 Miracle Maniac
75 06/09/1943 Skull Man

Episodes 76-78 were repeats of selected 1943 episodes.

The 1985 National Public Radio episodes were 30 minutes each. They were two series, Fear Cay (Episodes 79-85) and The Thousand-Headed Man (Episodes 86-91)

Fear Cay
79 09/30/1985 Kidnapped
80 10/07/1985 The Hanging Man
81 10/14/1985 The Disappointing Parcel
82 10/21/1985 The Island of Death
83 10/28/1985 Terror Underground
84 11/04/1985 The Mysterious Weeds
85 11/11/1985 The Crawling Terror

The Thousand-Headed Man
86 11/18/1985 The Black Stick
87 11/25/1985 Three Black Sticks
88 12/02/1985 Flight Into Fear
89 12/09/1985 Pagoda of The Hands
90 12/16/1985 The Accursed City
91 12/23/1985 The Deadly Treasure

Originally published on the Hidalgo Trading Company
Last published October 1, 2006 on DocSavage.Info



Doc Savage made it to the radio three times: 1934-35, 1943, and 1985. Inside is a list of the episodes culled from numerous sources….

› tags: lester dent / radio /

Comments

Comment Archive

  1. Mike says:

    If you missed the pulp versions, THEY’RE BACK! At least in a revitalized form.
    The pulp format of the Doc Savage Novels are being printed by Nostalgia Ventures, with Anthony Tollin acting as the series editor. Informational and historical articles are also included in the books.
    I just read this printing of “The Fortress of Solitude,” one of the two novels in this book. I love the classic illustrations and being able to see the original covers.
    Barnes and Nobles seems to have a problem listing them on their website and in the store, but Amazon has them as the second on the list in a search for “Doc Savage”

  2. Jeff Deischer says:

    Long time no talk! I just self-published my old DS chjonology, revising
    it and fixing all the typos Green Eagle put into it. It’s available at
    http://www.lulu.com/content/2847382 if you want to mention it somewhere,
    or put the word out on the ring.
    I can’t find a link to e-mail you personally, rather than making a comment, sorry.
    Thanks!

  3. Kimmer says:

    I grew up collecting the Bantam editions of Doc Savage. I was pleased to recently discover the new reprints of the 1930 magazines. It has been fun reading the “Man of Bronze” again 30+ years later. The writing is definitely from the 1930s. I don’t recall that in the Bantam editions. Do any of you know whether the Bantam editions were rewritten to update them from the 1930 versions?

  4. Scott Kimball says:

    As far as I know, Bantam did not change anything in the books, except for dropping the illustrations, but maybe someone else knows for sure.

  5. Stephen Hart says:

    Does anyone know a good place to download the radio plays?

    Stephen

  6. As the Bantam editions retained topical references and dates that established the stories as definitely ’30s and 40’s, I would say that they were unrevised printings of the original stories, Kimmer. One thing I HATE are revised/updated printings of original versions! I remember the hideous SPIDER novels that were put out in paperback in 1976 – rather than keep to the fabulous originals, as Carrol & Graff did in the ’90s, these travesties were totally upgraded to the ’70s in order to compete with The Destroyer series that were so popular at the time. The publishers totally shredded DEATH REIGN OF THE VAMPIRE KING, so much so that, years later, when I found it in Carrol & Graff, I was unable to enjoy it! So, rest easy, Bantam have done us a real service by reprinting the original stories!

  7. MBrown says:

    Bantam did NOT rewrite to update the novels. They apparently thought about doing so, but didn’t. They did cut out info at the end of the novels that mentioned the next one that followed.

    S&S, however, DID cut Dent’s novels. Several of the Sanctum Books editions restores text that S&S cut. Not sure there were a few cuts by Bantam, but they would note if that happened.

    With a complete collection of the Bantam novels, I decided to get the Sanctum editions for: the extra articles, restored text, original illustrations, and original covers, plus the other extras now and then.

  8. Timothy says:

    You can get the 80s radio dramas from archive.org.

    Does anyone know the name of the music theme at the beginning of the 80s radio dramas, or the composer? It’s never mentioned in the credits, from what I could pick out.

  9. Timothy says:

    I actually ended up talking to Roger Rittner, the producer of The Adventures of Doc Savage. He said the music is called “Pathfinders” and was composed by Graham de Wilde.

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