169n 06/46 Colors for Murder

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A kidnapping, a killing, and a young woman on the run set Doc on an explosive trail of conspiracy and intrigue that leads straight to a group of mysterious, multicolored whales!


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  1. Thomas Fortenberry

    Colors for Money is about as interesting as its title. Let’s just call it “Pink Whales” and be done.

    To be cold it is a weak, pointless, smalltime “adventure.” That said, we’ll just look at some highlights, because even the worst Docs are better than half the BS out there.

    A favorite Monkism: Monk, ever the bad dude, states bluntly, “I never threaten anybody. I make statements of fact.” You can take that to the bank.

    There are some interesting Doc psychological moments. In one place he looks over a lab because he needs to see if the guy is a crackpot or a serious threat. He can “read” labs and tell how advanced they and their projects are. Also Doc’s acumen is so great he can glance through a lab and unravel the entire mystery. Got to love that!

    In another spot Doc makes a judgment call to trust a woman, though he doubts his own “read” of her, and puts faith in her character to save them all. Elsewhere, in a fight with a crook the guy pulls a pen knife and Doc is horrified at the potential damage it could do to his hands. Now you know he is a surgeon first and foremost. One final thing: there is a point where Doc is said to be addicted to gadgets. Ahh, pshaw.

  2. Brian Lindsey

    As I’m yet to become enamored of the post-war “Noir/Detective” tales (despite the superior writing), I was expecting the worst with this one… But actually, it ain’t half bad. The story’s “McGuffin” is as oddball as they come but still plausible enough. I found the climax interesting, as Doc has to think in terms of tactical military strategy — how to defend the isolated experimental station from the gangsters with the very meager forces and weapons at hand. This is one of those Doc-Monk-Ham adventures in which they REALLY could’ve used their absent brothers’ assistance.

  3. Brian Lindsey

    As I’m yet to become enamored of the post-war “Noir/Detective” tales (despite the superior writing), I was expecting the worst with this one… But actually, it ain’t half bad. The story’s “McGuffin” is as oddball as they come but still plausible enough. I found the climax interesting, as Doc has to think in terms of tactical military strategy — how to defend the isolated experimental station from the gangsters with the very meager forces and weapons at hand. This is one of those Doc-Monk-Ham adventures in which they REALLY could’ve used their absent brothers’ assistance.

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