053 03/37 The Mental Wizard

by

The massive creature — a mile from head to toe! — sleeps in the steaming jungle. Is the behemoth real, or has the golden enchantress “Z” conquered the magnificent Man of Bronze with the hypnotic power of her superhuman mind? Doc Savage meets his mental match when he uncovers the strange lost kingdom of the deadly Amazon.


3703.jpg 053.jpg

Categories

Tags

Share This

5 Comments

  1. Bryan Bullock

    This is one of my all-time favorite Doc stories. There are more than a few that are better written, but “The Mental Wizard” is just so cool! An immense statue in the jungle; a lost, ancient people who inhabit it; a “magical” treasure and ancient elixer; the beautiful and mysterious “Z,” a potential match for Doc; Doc getting manipulated, and having to manipulate in his turn, and pulling off a few neat tricks without too many gandgets. I loved this one. I sometimes talk about the Wizard to people who don’t even read the books. I get lots of strange looks. But hey, it’s a great one!

  2. I read this in one afternoon in college a thousand years ago and remember it being good enough to keep me reading . . . and I particularly liked the Bama cover. It would have made a great Graphitti Designs poster. I wouldn’t say this story was in the top rank of Doc tales, but it’s got all of the Doc Savage conceits in place and if you aren’t too picky about plot or some lazy writing here and there, you’ll have a good time.

  3. Mark Carpenter

    Written by Dent in 1937 (a generally bad year for Doc stories), “The Mental Wizard” is a fairly rousing little tale. It’s no “Fortress of Solitude,” but the action is brisk, the location is fun and there are plenty of ingenious details. The idea of an entire city located inside a giant statue is pure Dent. And I loved Doc’s sleight of hand trick to crack open the secret of Klantic in the last pages.

    Bottom line, I give it a low “B”.

  4. Scott Kimball

    A fun and fast read, with lots of great elements. I thought it all wrapped up a little too fast at the end, though…it could have used a few more pages devoted to the city in the statue, but all in all, a good Doc tale.

  5. Richard Cording

    What is there to say? As I’ve mentioned on previous posts, I was never a great fan of the “lost civilisation” Doc story, but this one was truly great. It held my attention from start to finish. And Doc was his usual awesome self! A point struck me, though… Was Will Murray’s novel PYTHON ISLE based on an early draft of this story? The openings of both – a mystery plane, piloted by a missing aviator and accompanied by a stange woman in golden clothing, are identical.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *